Mechanical World

Learn How Gas Turbines Work and the Mechanism Behind it (In Details)

Learn How Gas Turbines Work and the Mechanism Behind it 

A gas turbine is a combustion engine that can convert natural gas or other liquid fuels to mechanical energy. This energy then drives a generator that produces electrical energy. It is electrical energy that moves along power lines to homes and businesses.. The main elements common to all gas turbine engines are:

1. An upstream rotating gas turbine compressor;
2. A combustor;
3. A downstream turbine on the same shaft as the compressor.

A fourth component is often used to increase efficiency (on turboprops and turbofans), to convert power into mechanical or electric form (on turboshafts and electric generators), or to achieve greater thrust-to-weight ratio (on afterburning engines).

Working Principle

The working principle of a gas turbine is a Brayton cycle with air as the working fluid. Atmospheric air flows through the compressor that brings it to higher pressure. Energy is then added by spraying fuel into the air and igniting it so the combustion generates a high-temperature flow. This high-temperature high-pressure gas enters a turbine, where it expands down to the exhaust pressure, producing a shaft work output in the process. 

The turbine shaft work is used to drive the compressor; the energy that is not used for compressing the working fluid comes out in the exhaust gases that can be used to do external work, such as directly producing thrust in a turbojet engine, or rotating a second, independent turbine (known as a power turbine) which can be connected to a fan, propeller, or electrical generator.

For more information watch the video below. 


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